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Antibiotics
    Home > Antibiotics > Floxin (Ofloxacin)
 

Floxin (Ofloxacin)
Select Ref Description Manufacturer Pack Size Strength Our Price
J140 Floxin (Ofloxacin) Generic 10 tabs 100 mg $ 2.45
J141 Floxin (Ofloxacin) Generic 10 tabs 200 mg $ 3.12
J142 Floxin (Ofloxacin) Generic 10 tabs 400 mg $ 4.20
P729 Oflox (Ofloxacin) Cipla 10 tabs 200 mg $ 3.85
P730 Oflox (Ofloxacin) Cipla 10 tabs 400 mg $ 8.69
Price is per pack & not per tab.. eg: if pack size is 10 tabs & price is $2.75 then for 100 tabs the price would be $27.50

What is ofloxacin?


Ofloxacin is in a group of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones (flor-o-KWIN-o-lones). Ofloxacin fights bacteria in the body.

Ofloxacin is used to treat bacterial infections that cause bronchitis, pneumonia, chlamydia, gonorrhea, skin infections, urinary tract infections, and infections of the prostate.

Ofloxacin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ofloxacin?


You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ofloxacin or similar antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), and others.

Before taking ofloxacin, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, joint problems, myasthenia gravis, seizures or epilepsy, diabetes, low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia), or a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome."

Avoid taking antacids, vitamin or mineral supplements, sucralfate (Carafate), or didanosine (Videx) powder or chewable tablets within 2 hours before or after you take ofloxacin. These other medicines can make ofloxacin much less effective when taken at the same time. Ofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. These effects may be more likely to occur if you are over 60, if you take an oral steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant. Stop taking ofloxacin and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions. Do not share this medication with another person (especially a child), even if they have the same symptoms you have.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ofloxacin?


You should not use this medication if you are allergic to ofloxacin or other fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), and others.

Before taking ofloxacin, tell your doctor if you have a heart rhythm disorder, especially if you are being treated with one of these medications: quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), disopyramide (Norpace), bretylium (Bretylol), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), or sotalol (Betapace).

If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication. Before you take ofloxacin, tell your doctor if you have:

a history of allergic reaction to an antibiotic;

myasthenia gravis;

joint problems;

kidney or liver disease;

epilepsy or a history of seizures;

diabetes;

low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or

a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome."

FDA pregnancy category C: It is not known whether ofloxacin is harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use ofloxacin without telling your doctor if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Ofloxacin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Ofloxacin may cause swelling or tearing of a tendon (the fiber that connects bones to muscles in the body), especially in the Achilles' tendon of the heel. These effects may be more likely to occur if you are over 60, if you take an oral steroid medication, or if you have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant. Stop taking ofloxacin and call your doctor at once if you have sudden pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or movement problems in any of your joints. Rest the joint until you receive medical care or instructions. Do not share this medication with another person (especially a child), even if they have the same symptoms you have.

How should I take ofloxacin?


Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take ofloxacin with a full glass of water (8 ounces). Drink several extra glasses of fluid each day to prevent crystals from forming in the urine.
You may take ofloxacin with or without food, but take it at the same time each day.

If you are being treated for gonorrhea, your doctor may also have you tested for syphilis, another sexually transmitted disease.

Take this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated.

Ofloxacin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.
This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using ofloxacin.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?


Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?


Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have taken too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, nausea, hot or cold feeling, confusion, and slurred speech.

What should I avoid while taking ofloxacin?


You may be taking certain other medicines that should not be taken at the same time as ofloxacin. Avoid taking the following medicines within 2 hours before or after you take ofloxacin. These other medicines can make ofloxacin much less effective when taken at the same time:

antacids that contain calcium, magnesium or aluminum (such as Tums, Mylanta, or Rolaids);

the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate);

didanosine (Videx) powder or chewable tablets; or

vitamin or mineral supplements that contain calcium, iron, or zinc.

Avoid exposure to sunlight, sunlamps, or tanning beds. Ofloxacin can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight, and a sunburn may result. Wear protective clothing and use a sunscreen (SPF-15 or higher) if you must be out in the sun. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun.

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to.

Ofloxacin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Ofloxacin side effects


Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using ofloxacin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

seizure (convulsions);

confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior;

dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat;

sudden pain or swelling near your joints (especially in your arm or ankle);

easy bruising or bleeding;

urinating less than usual or not at all;

numbness, burning, pain, or tingly feeling in your hands or feet;

pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness;

fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild.

Less serious side effects may include:

nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation;

feeling restless or anxious;

headache, dizziness;

muscle pain;

sleep problems (insomnia), or nightmares;

vaginal itching or discharge; or

mild skin itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

Ofloxacin Dosing Information


Usual Adult Dose for Inhalation Bacillus anthracis:

Mass casualty treatment or prophylaxis of inhalational anthrax: 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 60 days

In case of intentional anthrax release as a biological weapon, the Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has suggested that, based on in vitro studies, ofloxacin could be used for postexposure prophylaxis or treatment of inhalational anthrax if ciprofloxacin and doxycycline are unavailable.

Usual Adult Dose for Anthrax Prophylaxis:

Mass casualty treatment or prophylaxis of inhalational anthrax: 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 60 days

In case of intentional anthrax release as a biological weapon, the Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has suggested that, based on in vitro studies, ofloxacin could be used for postexposure prophylaxis or treatment of inhalational anthrax if ciprofloxacin and doxycycline are unavailable.

Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis:

400 mg orally every 12 hours for 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Campylobacter Gastroenteritis:

400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 3 days. However, most cases are self-limited, and prudent withholding of antibiotics in mild cases does not appear to slow recovery in most patients.

Usual Adult Dose for Cervicitis:

Due to Chlamydia trachomatis and/or Neisseria gonorrhoeae: 300 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Due to high rates of resistance, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) do not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or for infections acquired in Asia, the Pacific Islands, England, and Wales. Ceftriaxone or oral cefixime are recommended as first-line treatment of gonorrhea in the United States or acquired in these areas. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns should be monitored. The CDC recommend fluoroquinolones as alternative therapy only when gonococcal culture proves susceptibility.

Usual Adult Dose for Chancroid:

400 mg orally every 12 hours for 3 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Chlamydia Infection:

300 mg orally twice daily for 7 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Cystitis:

Uncomplicated: 200 mg orally every 12 hours
Duration: 3 days for infections due to Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae; 7 days for infections due to other organisms

Usual Adult Dose for Epididymitis -- Non-Specific:

200 to 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 10 days

Usual Adult Dose for Epididymitis -- Sexually Transmitted:

300 mg orally every 12 hours for 10 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Ofloxacin is recommended by the CDC for nongonococcal epididymitis in patients over 35 years old, for infections due to enteric organisms, or as an alternate agent for nongonococcal infections in patients with hypersensitivity to ceftriaxone or doxycycline.

Due to high rates of resistance, the CDC do not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or for infections acquired in Asia, the Pacific Islands, England, and Wales. Ceftriaxone is recommended as first-line treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or acquired in these areas. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns should be monitored. The CDC recommend fluoroquinolones as alternative therapy only when gonococcal culture proves susceptibility.

Usual Adult Dose for Gonococcal Infection -- Disseminated:

400 mg orally every 12 hours

Due to high rates of resistance, the CDC do not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or for infections acquired in Asia, the Pacific Islands, England, and Wales. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns should be monitored. The CDC recommend fluoroquinolones as alternative therapy only when culture proves susceptibility.

The CDC currently recommend initial hospitalization and injectable antimicrobials (i.e., ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ceftizoxime) for the treatment of disseminated gonococcal infection. Twenty-four to forty-eight hours after improvement begins, the patient can be switched to oral cefixime or cefpodoxime for a total course of at least 1 week.

Doxycycline therapy for 7 days (if not pregnant) or single dose azithromycin is also recommended to treat possible concurrent chlamydial infection.

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Gonococcal Infection -- Uncomplicated:

Uncomplicated urethral/cervical gonococcal infections: 400 mg orally one time

Due to high rates of resistance, the CDC do not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or for infections acquired in Asia, the Pacific Islands, England, and Wales. Ceftriaxone or oral cefixime are recommended as first-line treatment of gonorrhea in the United States or acquired in these areas. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns should be monitored. The CDC recommend fluoroquinolones as alternative therapy only when culture proves susceptibility.

Doxycycline therapy for 7 days (if not pregnant) or single dose azithromycin is also recommended to treat possible concurrent chlamydial infection.

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Joint Infection:

Mild to moderate: 400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 3 to 4 weeks, depending on the nature and severity of the infection. Longer therapy, 6 weeks or more, may be required for prosthetic joint infections. In addition, removal of the prosthesis is usually required to cure the infection.

Usual Adult Dose for Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare -- Treatment:

400 mg orally every 12 hours

The treatment of disseminated MAI infection in immunocompromised patients consists of either clarithromycin or azithromycin and 1 to 3 other drugs such as ethambutol, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, rifampin, rifabutin or amikacin. The optimal combination of drugs is not known. As long as a clinical and microbiological response is documented, therapy should be continued for life.

Usual Adult Dose for Nongonococcal Urethritis:

300 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 days

The patient's sexual partner(s) should also be evaluated/treated.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteomyelitis:

Mild to moderate: 400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 4 to 6 weeks, depending on the nature and severity of the infection. Chronic osteomyelitis may require one to two months of additional antibiotic therapy and may benefit from surgical debridement.

Usual Adult Dose for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease:

400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 14 days, depending on the nature and severity of the infection. The patient should be reevaluated and switched to parenteral antibiotics if she does not respond to oral therapy within 72 hours.

Due to high rates of resistance, the CDC do not recommend fluoroquinolones for treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or for infections acquired in Asia, the Pacific Islands, England, and Wales. A parenteral cephalosporin is recommended as first-line treatment of gonococcal infections in the United States or acquired in these areas. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns should be monitored. The CDC recommend fluoroquinolones as alternative therapy only when gonococcal culture proves susceptibility.

Usual Adult Dose for Plague:

Postexposure prophylaxis: 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 days
Treatment: 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 10 days

In case of intentional plague release as a biological weapon, the Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has suggested ofloxacin as an alternative agent to ciprofloxacin or doxycycline for treatment or postexposure prophylaxis of plague in a mass-casualty setting.

Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia:

400 mg orally every 12 hours for 10 to 21 days

Usual Adult Dose for Prostatitis:

300 mg orally every 12 hours for 6 weeks

Usual Adult Dose for Pyelonephritis:

Uncomplicated: 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Salmonella Enteric Fever:

200 to 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days

Usual Adult Dose for Salmonella Gastroenteritis:

200 to 400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 3 days. However, most cases are self-limited, and prudent withholding of antibiotics does not appear to slow recovery in most patients.

Usual Adult Dose for Shigellosis:

200 to 400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 3 to 5 days in severely ill patients.

Usual Adult Dose for Skin or Soft Tissue Infection:

Uncomplicated: 400 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 7 to 10 days, or for 3 days after acute inflammation disappears, depending on the nature and severity of the infection. For more severe infections, such as diabetic soft tissue infections, 14 to 21 days of therapy may be required.

Usual Adult Dose for Traveler's Diarrhea:

300 mg orally every 12 hours

Therapy should be continued for approximately 3 days. However, most cases are self-limited, and prudent withholding of antibiotics in mild cases does not appear to slow recovery in most patients.

Usual Adult Dose for Tuberculosis -- Active:

300 mg to 400 mg orally or IV every 12 hours

May be given in combination with at least 3 other active drugs for treatment of multi-drug resistant TB, or when the patient is intolerant of first-line agents. AFB smear and culture should be monitored monthly.

Duration: Treatment for TB should generally continue for 18 to 24 months, or for 12 to 18 months after culture results are negative.

Usual Adult Dose for Urinary Tract Infection:

Uncomplicated: 200 mg orally every 12 hours
Duration: 3 days for infections due to Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae; 7 days for infections due to other organisms

Complicated: 200 mg orally every 12 hours for 10 days

What other drugs will affect ofloxacin?


Before taking ofloxacin, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

cimetidine (Tagamet);

cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf);

insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth, such as glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta, Glynase);

theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Slo-Phyllin, Slo-Bid, Elixophyllin);

a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, others), etodolac (Lodine), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), meloxicam (Mobic), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox), piroxicam (Feldene), and others; or

an oral steroid medication such as betamethasone (Celestone), dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexpak), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Orapred), prednisone (Meticorten, Sterapred), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ofloxacin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?


Your pharmacist can provide more information about ofloxacin.

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